NEWSdial.com is a Resource of Well Researched Articles, Information, News, and Videos
Follow us on Twitter


 


Home > Sports > Baseball
General Menu

Baseball Gameplay - General Structure

Baseball is played between two teams of nine players each on a baseball field, usually under the authority of one or more officials, called umpires. There are usually four umpires in major league games; up to six (and as few as one) may officiate depending on the league and the importance of the game. There are four bases. Numbered counter-clockwise, first, second and third bases are cushions (sometimes informally referred to as bags) shaped as 15 in (38 cm) squares which are raised a short distance above the ground; together with home plate, the fourth "base," they form a square with sides of 90 ft (27.4 m) called the diamond. Home base is a pentagonal rubber slab known as home plate. The field is divided into two main sections: the infield contains the four bases, and beyond two adjacent sides of the diamond there is an outfield. The other two sides of the diamond form the start of the foul lines, which extend straight, and form the boundary in the outfield as well.

Baseball’s Nine Innings
The game is played in nine innings in which each team gets one turn to bat and try to score runs while the other pitches and defends in the field. In baseball, the defense always has the ball -- a fact that differentiates it from most other team sports. The teams switch every time the defending team gets three players of the batting team out. The winner is the team with the most runs after nine innings. In the case of a tie, additional innings are played until one team comes out ahead. At the start of the game, all nine players of the home team play the field, while players on the visiting team come to bat one at a time.

The basic contest is always between the pitcher for the fielding team, and a batter. The pitcher throws—pitches—the ball towards home plate, where the catcher for the fielding team waits to receive it. The batter stands in one of the batter's boxes and tries to hit the ball with a bat. The catcher's job is to catch any ball that the batter misses or does not swing at, and, most importantly, to "call" the game by a series of hand signals to the pitcher what pitch to throw and where. If the pitcher disagrees with the call, he will "shake off" the catcher by shaking his head no; he accepts the sign by nodding. The catcher's role becomes more crucial depending on how the game is going, and how the pitcher responds to a given situation. Each pitch begins a new play, which might consist of nothing more than the pitch itself.

Each half-inning, the goal of the defending team is to get three members of the other team out. A player who is out must leave the field and wait for his next turn at bat. There are many ways to get batters and baserunners out; some of the most common are catching a batted ball in the air, tag outs, force outs, and strikeouts. After the fielding team has put out three batters, that half of the inning is over and the team in the field and the team at bat switch places. Thus, a complete inning consists of each opposing side having a turn on offense.

The goal of the team at bat is to score runs; a player may do so only by batting, then becoming a base runner, touching all the bases in order (via one or more plays), and finally touching home plate. To that end, the goal of each batter is to enable baserunners to score or become a baserunner himself. The batter attempts to hit the ball into fair territory—between the foul lines—in such a way that the defending players cannot get them or the baserunners out. In general, the pitcher attempts to prevent this by pitching the ball in such a way that the batter cannot hit it cleanly.

Baseball Scoring
A baserunner who successfully touches home plate after touching all previous bases in order scores a run. In an enclosed field, a fair ball hit over the fence on the fly is normally an automatic home run, which entitles the batter and all runners to touch all the bases and score. A home run hit with all bases occupied is called a grand slam.

Share/Save/Bookmark



This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.

> Return to Baseball Reference Section
> Return to Main Sports Reference Category

>
Return to NEWSdial.com

 

Our Blogs

The Daily News

Other Sites We Run

Online Dating

Solar Power

STD Info Center

Funny Video Clips

Parkour Videos

Hidden Camera Pranks

Kindle Edition Books

Wii Games Magazine

Parp Inhibitors Cancer

Recommended Resources

Google (for search)

CNN (for news)

Our Videos

NEWSdial.com
produced these videos:

Japanese Balloon Bombs

Cute Cats

Cuddly Kittens

Newsletters

ASA Newsletter
The ASA newsletter
contains vital information on research and news related to Allergies, Sinusitis, and Asthma.
Subscribe
Archives
FAQ

Our Contact Info

NEWSdial.com
29030 Town Center Loop E.
Suite 202 - 188
Wilsonville, OR 97070
info@newsdial.com

Privacy Policy

View our Privacy Policy




NEWSdial.com is a reference directory and news resource with a focus on unique news articles.
NEWSdial.com is a customer-friendly news and reference site.
NEWSdial.com is not responsible for the content of external sites listed.
All NEWSdial.com articles are copyright 2004-2011 by NEWSdial.com. All Rights Reserved.
Online Dating Directory | Online Dating Newsletter | Joe Tracy
Webmaster Articles | Online Dating Industry
| Dating Games