NEWSdial.com is a Resource of Well Researched Articles, Information, News, and Videos
Follow us on Twitter


 


Home > Animals > Birds
General Menu

Anatomy and Sexual Habits of Penguins

Penguins are superbly adapted to an aquatic life. Their wings have become flippers, useless for flight in the air. In the water, however, penguins are astonishingly agile. Within the smooth plumage a layer of air is preserved, ensuring buoyancy. The air layer also helps insulate the bird in the icy waters of the Antarctic. The plumage of penguins in tropical and temperate zones is much thinner.

On land, penguins use their tails and wings to maintain balance for their upright stance.

All penguins have a white underside and a dark (mostly black) upperside. This is for camouflage. A predator looking up from below (such as an orca or a leopard seal) has difficulty distinguishing between a white penguin belly and the reflective water surface.

Diving penguins reach 6 to 12 km/h, though there are reports of velocities of 27 km/h (which are probably realistic in the case of startled flight). The small penguins do not usually dive deep; they catch their prey near the surface in dives that normally last only one or two minutes. Larger penguins can dive deep in case of need. The Emperor Penguin has been recorded reaching a depth of 875 feet (270 metres) and staying submerged for 18 minutes.

Penguin Tobogganing
On land, penguins are clumsy. They either waddle on their feet or slide on their bellies across the snow, a movement called "tobogganing", which allows them to conserve energy and move relatively fast at the same time.

Penguins have an excellent sense of hearing. Their eyes are adapted for underwater vision, and are their primary means of locating prey and avoiding predators; in air, conversely, they are nearsighted. Their sense of smell has not been researched so far.

Penguin Genitalia
Penguins have no external genitalia. Consequently, chromosome testing must be done in order to determine a penguin's sex.

Sexuality and Mating Habits
Penguins mate for life. They generally raise a small brood, and the parents co-operate in caring for the clutch and for the young.

Penguin Homosexuality
Male penguin couples have also been documented. They too mate for life and build nests together. Male couples have been recorded using a stone to replace sitting on an egg in the nest. In 2004, the Central Park Zoo in the United States replaced one male couple's stone with a fertile egg which they then raised as their own offspring. This was the basis for the children's picture book And Tango Makes Three. Homosexuality among penguins has also been reported by a German zoo and Kelly Tarlton's Aquarium in Auckland New Zealand.  

Share/Save/Bookmark



 

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.


> Return to Birds Reference Section
> Return to Animals Main Reference Category
>
Return to NEWSdial.com

 

Our Blogs

The Daily News

Other Sites We Run

Online Dating

Solar Power

STD Info Center

Funny Video Clips

Parkour Videos

Hidden Camera Pranks

Kindle Edition Books

Wii Games Magazine

Parp Inhibitors Cancer

Recommended Resources

Google (for search)

CNN (for news)

Our Videos

NEWSdial.com
produced these videos:

Japanese Balloon Bombs

Cute Cats

Cuddly Kittens

Newsletters

ASA Newsletter
The ASA newsletter
contains vital information on research and news related to Allergies, Sinusitis, and Asthma.
Subscribe
Archives
FAQ

Our Contact Info

NEWSdial.com
29030 Town Center Loop E.
Suite 202 - 188
Wilsonville, OR 97070
info@newsdial.com

Privacy Policy

View our Privacy Policy




NEWSdial.com is a reference directory and news resource with a focus on unique news articles.
NEWSdial.com is a customer-friendly news and reference site.
NEWSdial.com is not responsible for the content of external sites listed.
All NEWSdial.com articles are copyright 2004-2011 by NEWSdial.com. All Rights Reserved.
Online Dating Directory | Online Dating Newsletter | Joe Tracy
Webmaster Articles | Online Dating Industry
| Dating Games